Tag Archives: Bakersfield Museum of Art

Buck Owens’ Ghost Is Alive After Seven Years

4 May
BUCK OWENS' MAUSOLEUM

BUCK OWENS’ MAUSOLEUM

PHOTO BY: WANDA WINKLER

  March 25 was the seven-year anniversary of the death of Buck Owens. So where is the country western music legend? He is buried in The Buck Owens Family mausoleum in Greenlawn Southwest Cemetery, 2739 Panama Lane, Bakersfield. The mausoleum, also named  “Buck’s Place,” is the largest structure in the graveyard except for the Georgian mansion used for the office and mortuary building. He is interred in the mausoleum which also contains his mother and the ashes of his first wife, Bonnie Campbell Owens. Some people go to the graveyard looking for Buck. Others write books about his ghost. “The Ghost of Buck Owens: And Other Tales From the San Joaquin,” by Steve Sorensen was released in 2011.                                                 

  Chris Porfiri, 47, who works at Greenlawn Southwest Cemetery said, “there have been a couple of times when folks will stop into the park and ask where they can find Buck Owens’s grave– so we direct them to the mausoleum.” For more details on finding his grave go to http://www.findagrave.com.

  Bakersfield’s most popular entertainer, Owens was born Alvis Edgar Owens, Jr., in Sherman, Texas, to a sharecropping family and moved to Bakersfield when he was 21 years old. He signed a recording contract with Los Angeles music giant Capital Records in 1957, and his career took off from there. He became one of America’s top country western musicians, singers, writers, and entrepreneurs. The Crystal Palace, his legacy museum located at 2800 Buck Owens Blvd., is a unique masterpiece exhibiting exquisite western charm, history, and hometown hospitality. Owens left a sensational mark on this city, including his last No.1 hit song titled, “The Streets of Bakersfield.” For more information go to http://www.buckowens.com.

  Dave Lyman, 55, from the Bakersfield Convention and Visitors Bureau said he’s never been asked about Owens’ grave site. However, “large numbers of tour buses stop here on their way to someplace else, like Fresno, Yosemite, or Sequoia National Park. They are not making a pilgrimage to Bakersfield to see the Crystal Palace specifically or to go to Buck Owens’ grave,” Lyman said.

  “The bus drivers are only allowed to drive so many hours a day, so they stop in Bakersfield because it is the midway point between several locations. Fortunately, the Crystal Palace is conveniently located and because they serve great meals, it’s a favorite location for the bus drivers and the passengers,” Lyman said.

  Buck Owens made his mark in life as a composer, singer, entrepreneur, and publisher, and in death with his majestic burial site. His mausoleum is original and available to the public free of charge at Greenlawn Cemetery. “After all,” Lyman said, “it’s not like you have a Crystal Palace or Buck Owens in every town.”

 

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“The Good, The Bad and The Judges,” Tour at Historic Union Cemetery Fascinates Public

28 Apr
"THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE JUDGES," TOUR AT HISTORIC UNION CEMETERY FACINATES ALL AGES.

“THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE JUDGES,” TOUR AT HISTORIC UNION CEMETERY FASCINATES ALL AGES.

Tours of the Historic Union Cemetery and more information on their events can be found at http://www.UnionCemetery1872.com

COL. THOMAS BAKER'S OBELISK EXEMPLIFIES HIS DEDICATION TO MAKING BAKERSFIELD LIVE FOR ETERNITY.

COL. THOMAS BAKER’S OBELISK EXEMPLIFIES HIS DEDICATION TO MAKING BAKERSFIELD LIVE FOR ETERNITY.

Judge Banjamin Brundage (1834-1911) was instrumental in relocating Kern County's seat from Havilah to Bakersfield.

Judge Benjamin Brundage (1834-1911) was instrumental in relocating Kern County’s seat from Havilah to Bakersfield.

A stroll through the emerald golf course grounds of Union Cemetery Saturday morning, April 27, for “The Good, The Bad, and The Judges,” tour was fascinating. It was a special tour of the Pioneers Section where Bakersfield’s founding fathers are buried.The City of Bakersfield is named after Col. Thomas Baker, who was an attorney, a judge, and served as a senator from Fresno and Tulare counties 1861-1862. He loved the land and with Harvey Brown, bought swamp land in 1863 that is now Bakersfield.  He is one of ‘The Good,” as well as one of “The Judges”. His profound knowledge and foresight was instrumental in the creation and promotion of Bakersfield and the welfare if it’s residents.

Benjamin Brundage, (1834-1911) was Bakersfield’s first Superior Court Judge. The original Kern County seat of government was in Havilah, but Brundage fought hard to have the seat of government permanently moved to Bakersfield.  Brundage Lane is named in his honor.

Ralph shot Horace Montague December 1, 1915. He was hanged to death at San Quentin January, 1, 1915.RALPH M. FARISS, IS ONE OF THE “BAD” (1889-1915).

Peggy Schrader tells tour group about the infamy of one of  Bakersfield’s trouble makers, Ralph M. Ferris (1889-1915). Ralph, a resident of Bakersfield, was hanged in San Quentin in 1915 after he committed a train robbery in which  he shot and killed Horace E. Montague, December 1, 1913 near El Monte, CA. 
        VICK DOCENT DESCRIBES SHOOT OUT BETWEEN PERCY DOUGLAS AND CHIEF EDWIN L. WILLOW.

VICKI SCHALLOCK DESCRIBES SHOOT OUT BETWEEN ANOTHER “BAD”– PERCY DOUGLAS AND THE “GOOD” CHIEF EDWIN L. WILLOW.
 
EDWIN L. WILLOW WAS A MAN WHO WORE MANY HATS--OWNER OF WILLOW FURNITURE, DEPUTY SHERIFF, AND FIRE CHIEF

EDWIN L. WILLOW WAS A MAN WHO WORE MANY HATS–OWNER OF WILLOW FURNITURE, DEPUTY SHERIFF, AND FIRE CHIEF.

UNION CEMETERY IS 141 YEARS OLD, AND PRESENTLY UNDERGOING RECONSTRUCTION

UNION CEMETERY IS 141 YEARS OLD, AND PRESENTLY UNDERGOING RECONSTRUCTION.

LAST YEAR THE CITY OF BAKERSFIELD DECLARED UNION CEMETERY A HISTORIC SITE--RENOVATIONS ARE UNDERWAY

LAST YEAR THE CITY OF BAKERSFIELD DECLARED UNION CEMETERY A HISTORIC SITE–RENOVATIONS ARE UNDERWAY.

GROUNDS KEEPER, ROBERT GALAVIZ TAKES GREAT PRIDE IN RESTORING THE BEAUTY TO UNION CEMETERY.

GROUNDS KEEPER, ROBERT GALAVIZ TAKES GREAT PRIDE IN RESTORING THE BEAUTY TO UNION CEMETERY.

JIM DOCENT WELCOMES VISITORS TO UNION CEMETERY.

JIM MCCONNELL WELCOMES VISITORS TO UNION CEMETERY.

As one of the grave stones reads:

 “ Reader, Behold! As you pass by, As you are now, So once was I, As I am now, so you must be, Prepare for death and follow me.”

Bakersfield Museum of Art Spring 2013 Exhibitions are Intoxicating

21 Apr

BAKERSFIELD MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTS SPRING 2013 EXHIBITIONS

Bakersfield Museum of Art Presents WINESCAPES Thursday May 2, 2013

Bakersfield Museum of Art Presents WINESCAPES Thursday May 2, 2013

Spring Exhibitions are from March 28, 2013 to June 9th, 2013. For more information go to http://www.bmoa.org.

Come one come all to the Winescapes–A taste of Bakersfield Museum of Art on May 2, 2013, “for wine tasting, gourmet hors d’oeuvres, a special auction of original wine-themed art and much more…”

Scott Johnson, 63, born and raised in Bakersfield, is a member of the Bakersfield Museum of Art. Johnson’s Rotary Club “meets here once a week,” said Johnson and he tells all of his friends what exhibits are in town. They are looking forward to Winescapes and other exhibits.

Vacancy: Paintings by Matt Condron

90 DEGREES IN THE SHADE-BY MATT CONDRON-BMOA

 
90 DEGREES IN THE SHADE-Oil on canvas by Matt Condron

When does a painting look like a photograph? When Matt Condron paints it. Curatorial assistant, Rachel Magnus, 28, California State University, Bakersfield Art/History 2012 graduate, is a docent at the museum and has met artist Condron.

“I think it is fascinating that you can mentally place yourself in the chairs and bring yourself back into ‘a memory’. Matt’s paintings are relatable to everyone.” said Magnus. “Matt has no formal painting or drawing training–he studied photography. By painting empty locations of distinct time periods, the subject becomes viewer and their response to the work. You are the subject looking into these spaces, taking in the experience. Why Chairs? Because according to Condron, they ‘symbolize humans,'” said Magnus. Nostalgia and solitude are abundant in this wonderful exhibit. “Matt Condron has painted unoccupied objects with reverence for his subject and astonishing technical prowess. His painstakingly rendered images of vacant chairs invite the viewers to share a moment of quiet with him.” (Bakersfield Museum of Art)

Condron currently lives and works in Portland, OR. but has a website for more information: www.mattcondron.com or

For more information contact www.bmoa.org

Bakersfield Culture Sizzles as Art and Theatre Celebrate 10 years at “The Empty Space”

14 Apr
"Kreative Allusions," by John Kirkeby

“Kreative Allusions,” by John Kirkeby-photo by Wanda Winkler

Bakersfield Culture Sizzles as The Empty Space Art Gallery/Theatre Celebrates Ten Years The Empty Space theatre and art gallery, located at 706 Oak St., is a cultural icon in Bakersfield. It is celebrating it’s tenth anniversary with an exhibit from John Kirkeby called, “Kreative Allusions” and a play called, “Crimes of the Heart,” written by Beth Henley and directed by Bob Kempf. Gallery director, Jesus Fidel, 30, prides the theatre/gallery as beng, “the only totally nonprofit, donation based theatre/gallery in the U.S. run by 20 volunteers 365 days a year,” said Fidel. Each month a different artist is featured in the art gallery and a different play is presented to the public. The plays are usually locally written or off-Broadway shows, with suggested donations of $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors per theatre show. Visiting the gallery exhibit is free and delicious snacks, coffee and wine is available. While the artist reception hours are between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on weekends, the plays take place in the evenings on weekends. For a schedule of this month’s showings and future events go to www.esonline.org. John Kirkeby, retired from Xerox ten years ago, now has more time to be creative. He is celebrating his second showing at The Empty Space. “I really like the casual atmosphere at this gallery. For my first exhibit I was really nervous and brought 41 paintings and sold only a few. This year I have 21 paintings and they are selling very well,” said Kirkeby. He also has many prints of his artwork to choose from for sale at the gallery. If you are artistic and would like to exhibit your work to the public you can contact Michelle Guerrero, 35, the marketing director at (661) 327-7529. Both Guerrero and Fidel have been with The Empty Space for three years and are always available to answer any questions. If you love art you can also go to the Bakersfield Museum of Art website, www.bmoa.org for more information on  Bakersfield’s hidden art treasures.